$15 WAS NOT FOR ALL: EMPLOYER LIABILITY IN A TWO-TIERED WAGE STATE

On June 9th, hear from restaurant employers, attorneys, and workers who are citing increased liability, complications, and challenges arising from the widened gap that was created between tipped and non-tipped workers as a result of the $15 minimum wage law. At this event, several advocacy organizations,  employers, consumers and faith leaders will be announcing the launch of a coalition calling for One Fair Wage, the elimination of the lower wage for tipped workers in New York State.

When: Thursday, June 9, 2016, 10:00 a.m.

Where: Amali Restaurant, 115 E 60th St, New York, NY 10022

While representing a monumental step forward for low-wage workers, New York State’s recent $15 minimum wage increase unfortunately left out almost 300,000 tipped workers, whose wages actually decreased as part of the minimum wage increase, from 83% of the minimum wage, to 66% of the minimum wage. A new report released by the Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United documents recent class action lawsuits and multiple restaurant employer experiences of costly liability arising from the complicated rules surrounding paying tipped workers a lower minimum wage. It also documents recent tipped worker experiences of receiving increased workload from their employers since the $15 bill was passed, as they are now the ‘cheaper’ workers whose wages did not increase. Seven states, including California, which also recently went to $15, do not have a lower wage for tipped workers; when California recently raised its minimum wage to $15, the wage increased for all workers, tipped and non-tipped, and thus no liability was imposed on restaurant employers, and no extra burden was imposed on tipped workers.

Panelists:

James Mallios, Owner, Amali Restaurant

Dino Lavorini, General Manager, The Modern at the MOMA

Brian Keyser, Owner, Casselula Wine & Cheese Bar

Rosanne Martino, National Manager, Colors Restaurant

Jeffrey Ruzal, Epstein, Becker and Green, P.C.

Paul Sonn, National Employment Law Project 

Chris Williams, Principal, Workers Law Office

Click here to register by June 2nd 

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